academia, Literary Commentary, writing

writing || The Ghost and the Boss: Power Dynamics throughout History in Hamlet and Death of a Salesman

There’s a very good reason the most widely published books in history were works of fiction, chronicling the tales of ordinary men locked in an often fatal battle with a fellow man or a supernatural monster. Fiction captures the nuances of those ideas and imbues them in an ageless magic that enables them to last through centuries of change. Shakespeare’s Hamlet and Miller’s Death of a Salesman were written hundreds of years apart, but man’s struggle for power over his own life remains constant.

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academia, Literary Commentary, writing

writing || Establishing the Cage, Foreshadowing the Singing: A commentary on Angelou’s Prologue

Not all works of literature use para-textual features in the same way – or even at all – but Maya Angelou’s prologue in her autobiography, “I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings”, is a feature of the text which should not be overlooked, for it sets the stage for her to share her immensely difficult but powerful personal story. The piece’s title, “I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings”, is an allegory referring to her realization of the beauty and meaning held back by the cage created by her physical, psychological, and interpersonal circumstances. Knowing this to be the central tension in Angelou’s life, and therefore her autobiography, the prologue presents itself to readers with a dual purpose.

academia, Literary Commentary, writing

writing || Parenting is like a Fencing Match: Scene Analysis in “I Know why the Caged Bird Sings”

The ultimate coming-of-age story that doesn’t shy away from even the more difficult topics, Maya Angelou’s “I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings” is immensely honest and vulnerable. Her experience being sent from mother and father to grandmother several times throughout her life is a situation not all readers can identify with. However, the truths she shares about family, love and self-identity through these experiences are universal. By chapter 33, both Maya and her brother Bailey have become adolescents, and their trials and tribulations are representative of those which many other adolescents face. In fact, Maya’s account of Bailey’s fight with their Mother illustrates several truths all readers can relate to when it comes to conflict between a parent and child. In particular, her use of descriptive language characteristic of a fencing match provides a lens through which to understand her mother’s and brother’s conflict, and thus the plight of our own youthful turbulent relationships with our parents.

academia, Literary Commentary, writing

writing || The Hereditary Sickness: An Analysis of the Structure, Tensions, and Motifs of “Mad Shadows”

The passage from pages 52 to 55 of the book “Mad Shadows” by Marie-Claire Blais presents a turning point within the novel. It is in these four pages that the deterioration of the characters and superficial relationships begins to occur. An aura of sickness and wickedness spreads throughout the family – in their bodies and in their relationships – foreshadowing the falling apart of the household later in the novel.

organization, videos, writing

organization || HOW I READ: Annotating Books and eBooks, Keeping a Literature “Journal”

I've officially gone over to the dark side. I've been converted. To what, you ask? I now annotate - that's write, I MARK UP - books. With pen. Yeah, you heard me right. *gasps and faints in the crowd* Jokes aside, I just got back from a family vacation in which I did a lot… Continue reading organization || HOW I READ: Annotating Books and eBooks, Keeping a Literature “Journal”

academia, Literary Commentary, Psychology, writing

writing || Human Virtues and the Meaning of Life: Rousseau vs. Frankl

I’ve had “Discourse on the Arts and Sciences” by Jean-Jacques Rousseau on my “currently reading” shelf for the longest time, and just a few weeks ago I had a little reading inspiration so I decided to finish it. Turns out I only had several pages to go anyway. Then, I was recommended “Man’s Search for… Continue reading writing || Human Virtues and the Meaning of Life: Rousseau vs. Frankl

academia, Philosophy, Psychology

writing || Wow: “Nation” by Terry Pratchett

Just finished reading “Nation” by Terry Pratchett! It’s a 5-star in my Goodreads! But before I start talking about it, here’s its Goodreads synopsis: Synopsis Alone on a desert island — everything and everyone he knows and loves has been washed away in a storm — Mau is the last surviving member of his nation.… Continue reading writing || Wow: “Nation” by Terry Pratchett